In Patrick’s August Buffalo Spree column, he shares ten things he learned while raising money for his business. It’s a helpful, user-friendly breakdown of some important things to consider in the process. Look for Patrick’s monthly business column in Spree magazine.
Buffalonians may know City Dining Cards from the colorful decks of restaurant and bar discount cards that appear on store shelves during the holidays. But the company that I founded more than three years ago has taken its model and expanded to nearly 20 markets throughout the United States and Europe. Now we’re focused on building engaging customer loyalty experiences for people, businesses and non-profits around the world. All this growth requires a lot of capital. And after three years of bootstrapping the business, it was time to raise our first round of funding.
This process has been one of the most interesting, frustrating, exciting and fulfilling learning experiences of my life, and the timing was right. Buffalo’s appetite for startups is growing. Believe it or not, the world’s largest business idea competition, 43North, takes places in Buffalo and organizations and programs like Z80 Labs, Dig, CoWork Buffalo, Startup NY, Launch NY and The Buffalo Angels are encouraging more entrepreneurs to start and grow their businesses in Western New York.
The competitions, plans, ideas and organizations are working. Buffalo’s startup community is growing and the startup community is taking note. Recent stories is the Financial Times, The Globe and Mail and Huffington Post all tout Buffalo as the next great place to start your business. With all of this energy and with the exciting conclusion of 43 North’s inaugural year right around the corner, I though it was time to share what I’ve learned raising money for one of my businesses.
It all starts with basics and vision. Before you start raising money, it’s critical that you can succinctly describe your business and communicate where you want to take it, all with just a few sentences. Your elevator pitch has to be perfect and it has to make sense to people unfamiliar with you, your business and your industry. Practice makes perfect, so practice in front of a mirror, in the car, with your dog and most importantly, with your team.
You have to clearly demonstrate the opportunity. Investors want to know that there’s a market for what you’re selling, and they want to know how big it is. You really need to understand the space you’re playing in and how much market share you think you can take.Investors also want to make sure that your model is scalable. Sure, you have a good contract or two and you’ve demonstrated feasibility in a few markets, but how will you continue to scale and grow the business?
What’s your worth? Setting your valuation is one of the most difficult parts of the process because there are dozens of ways to set this number. And once you set your valuation, will your investors agree? You have to consider how much of your business you’re willing to give away and understanding “pre-money” value and “post-money” value is important too. Here’s an easy-numbers example to put this into context: Say you own 100% of your business and you have a pre-money valuation (the value of your business before raising money) of $2 million. If you raise $1 million, your post-money valuation (the sum of your pre-money valuation and total dollars raised) is now $3 million. When the deal closes you will own roughly two-thirds of the company, or $2 million of value in a company now worth $3 million.
Practicality rules. At the end of the day, investors are interested in making a return on their investment. Pie-in-the-sky ideas are great but strong net profits are even better. Having a good understand of financials, including pro-formas and cash-flow statements, is important as discussions with investors move from general interest to the due diligence process.
Show me the sizzle. I know that I just told you that practicality rules but everyone loves sizzle. Investors are people too and if your company demonstrates their understanding of the newest technology, app or market segment, your potential investors will be as excited as a kid in a candy store. Novelty and excitement are key components in engaging investors and captivating their attention from day one.
Play to your strengths and know your weaknesses. At the end of the day, Angel and early-stage investors are investing in people, not the business. They want to know that you have what it takes to navigate the choppy waters that inevitably face you. So why do you deserve their money? How are you going to get them a big return on their investment? Finding the right amount of confidence balanced with some humility is key
Start sharing. You have to share your story with everyone you know. Your family, friends and business associates may be able to help with small, early-stage investment. Locally, the Bufalo Angels, Z80 Labs, Dig, CoWork Buffalo and Launch NY can provide the guidance and connections you’ll need to turn your idea into a funded business.
Great partners are key. Raising money is a struggle and you’ll need help and support to get through the long and daunting process.Great business partners and advisors are one of the keys to a successful round of funding. Kevin Christner of Richmond Capital Partners, Jack McGowan of Insyte Consulting and The Buffalo Angels, and David Roach of Blair and Roach were instrumental in helping the team at City Dining Cards build our presentation, connect with investors and put the deal together. This is truly a team effort.
Just when you think it’s almost finished, it’s not. There’s an obstacle at almost every turn but the biggest obstacle is figuring out how to run your existing business and raise money at the same time. It’s almost impossible to do both and raising money can feel like a full-time job. As you approach closing, subtle changes in contract terms and legalese can aggravate investors, delay closing and raise the blood pressure of everyone involved in the process. It’s important to keep your eye on the prize and remember that you’re all working together to build something great.
San Francisco isn’t the reality. We live in a world of celebrity CEOs and multi-billion dollar valuations for companies without any revenue streams. This may happen in Silicon Valley, but it’s not the reality in most places. It’s important to approach the process with vision, a great idea, a strong model and an even stronger team. Those four things are alluring to investors from as close as Syracuse and as far away as San Francisco.
Get connected: 43North, Buffalo Angels, Z80 Labs.
Patrick Finan is the founder and CEO of City Dining Cards and the founder and principal of Block Club, a branding and marketing agency. 

In Patrick’s August Buffalo Spree column, he shares ten things he learned while raising money for his business. It’s a helpful, user-friendly breakdown of some important things to consider in the process. Look for Patrick’s monthly business column in Spree magazine.

Buffalonians may know City Dining Cards from the colorful decks of restaurant and bar discount cards that appear on store shelves during the holidays. But the company that I founded more than three years ago has taken its model and expanded to nearly 20 markets throughout the United States and Europe. Now we’re focused on building engaging customer loyalty experiences for people, businesses and non-profits around the world. All this growth requires a lot of capital. And after three years of bootstrapping the business, it was time to raise our first round of funding.

This process has been one of the most interesting, frustrating, exciting and fulfilling learning experiences of my life, and the timing was right. Buffalo’s appetite for startups is growing. Believe it or not, the world’s largest business idea competition, 43North, takes places in Buffalo and organizations and programs like Z80 Labs, Dig, CoWork Buffalo, Startup NY, Launch NY and The Buffalo Angels are encouraging more entrepreneurs to start and grow their businesses in Western New York.

The competitions, plans, ideas and organizations are working. Buffalo’s startup community is growing and the startup community is taking note. Recent stories is the Financial Times, The Globe and Mail and Huffington Post all tout Buffalo as the next great place to start your business. With all of this energy and with the exciting conclusion of 43 North’s inaugural year right around the corner, I though it was time to share what I’ve learned raising money for one of my businesses.

It all starts with basics and vision. Before you start raising money, it’s critical that you can succinctly describe your business and communicate where you want to take it, all with just a few sentences. Your elevator pitch has to be perfect and it has to make sense to people unfamiliar with you, your business and your industry. Practice makes perfect, so practice in front of a mirror, in the car, with your dog and most importantly, with your team.

You have to clearly demonstrate the opportunity. Investors want to know that there’s a market for what you’re selling, and they want to know how big it is. You really need to understand the space you’re playing in and how much market share you think you can take.Investors also want to make sure that your model is scalable. Sure, you have a good contract or two and you’ve demonstrated feasibility in a few markets, but how will you continue to scale and grow the business?

What’s your worth? Setting your valuation is one of the most difficult parts of the process because there are dozens of ways to set this number. And once you set your valuation, will your investors agree? You have to consider how much of your business you’re willing to give away and understanding “pre-money” value and “post-money” value is important too. Here’s an easy-numbers example to put this into context: Say you own 100% of your business and you have a pre-money valuation (the value of your business before raising money) of $2 million. If you raise $1 million, your post-money valuation (the sum of your pre-money valuation and total dollars raised) is now $3 million. When the deal closes you will own roughly two-thirds of the company, or $2 million of value in a company now worth $3 million.

Practicality rules. At the end of the day, investors are interested in making a return on their investment. Pie-in-the-sky ideas are great but strong net profits are even better. Having a good understand of financials, including pro-formas and cash-flow statements, is important as discussions with investors move from general interest to the due diligence process.

Show me the sizzle. I know that I just told you that practicality rules but everyone loves sizzle. Investors are people too and if your company demonstrates their understanding of the newest technology, app or market segment, your potential investors will be as excited as a kid in a candy store. Novelty and excitement are key components in engaging investors and captivating their attention from day one.

Play to your strengths and know your weaknesses. At the end of the day, Angel and early-stage investors are investing in people, not the business. They want to know that you have what it takes to navigate the choppy waters that inevitably face you. So why do you deserve their money? How are you going to get them a big return on their investment? Finding the right amount of confidence balanced with some humility is key

Start sharing. You have to share your story with everyone you know. Your family, friends and business associates may be able to help with small, early-stage investment. Locally, the Bufalo Angels, Z80 Labs, Dig, CoWork Buffalo and Launch NY can provide the guidance and connections you’ll need to turn your idea into a funded business.

Great partners are key. Raising money is a struggle and you’ll need help and support to get through the long and daunting process.Great business partners and advisors are one of the keys to a successful round of funding. Kevin Christner of Richmond Capital Partners, Jack McGowan of Insyte Consulting and The Buffalo Angels, and David Roach of Blair and Roach were instrumental in helping the team at City Dining Cards build our presentation, connect with investors and put the deal together. This is truly a team effort.

Just when you think it’s almost finished, it’s not. There’s an obstacle at almost every turn but the biggest obstacle is figuring out how to run your existing business and raise money at the same time. It’s almost impossible to do both and raising money can feel like a full-time job. As you approach closing, subtle changes in contract terms and legalese can aggravate investors, delay closing and raise the blood pressure of everyone involved in the process. It’s important to keep your eye on the prize and remember that you’re all working together to build something great.

San Francisco isn’t the reality. We live in a world of celebrity CEOs and multi-billion dollar valuations for companies without any revenue streams. This may happen in Silicon Valley, but it’s not the reality in most places. It’s important to approach the process with vision, a great idea, a strong model and an even stronger team. Those four things are alluring to investors from as close as Syracuse and as far away as San Francisco.

Get connected: 43North, Buffalo Angels, Z80 Labs.

Patrick Finan is the founder and CEO of City Dining Cards and the founder and principal of Block Club, a branding and marketing agency. 

Occasionally, when I leave the doors of Block Club, I travel about 100 feet from my desk and spend my time in the basement at Squeaky Wheel, Buffalo’s long-standing media arts center where I also teach some classes on using creative design software like the Adobe Suite. I don’t do this because I’m some sort of expert user of any of these powerful and complex applications, but rather because I really enjoy teaching people things and the unique challenges that it presents. Taking these complicated, tedious processes, many of which have become a sort of muscle memory through repetition in my work, and explaining them in simple terms to someone who has no prior understanding is at once challenging, eye opening, and somehow really satisfying. For me, however, one particularly tricky skill to speak about has always been how to use the pen tool. Maybe because it’s too ingrained in me at this point that I’m no longer conscious of how exactly to get it to do what I want anymore, it just kind of happens somehow. And also because when you get down to the nuts and bolts of how it works, it’s really pretty damn strange. That’s why I use this online pen tool game/tutorial; it’s so fascinating. It teaches you by example, most of what you need to know to master drawing with the pen tool and it does so completely without language, which is something that can easily excite any graphic designer. Try it out for yourself and see how well you do. If you find it incredibly frustrating, maybe I’ll see you across the street at one of my workshops.-Ryan
Occasionally, when I leave the doors of Block Club, I travel about 100 feet from my desk and spend my time in the basement at Squeaky Wheel, Buffalo’s long-standing media arts center where I also teach some classes on using creative design software like the Adobe Suite. I don’t do this because I’m some sort of expert user of any of these powerful and complex applications, but rather because I really enjoy teaching people things and the unique challenges that it presents. Taking these complicated, tedious processes, many of which have become a sort of muscle memory through repetition in my work, and explaining them in simple terms to someone who has no prior understanding is at once challenging, eye opening, and somehow really satisfying. For me, however, one particularly tricky skill to speak about has always been how to use the pen tool. Maybe because it’s too ingrained in me at this point that I’m no longer conscious of how exactly to get it to do what I want anymore, it just kind of happens somehow. And also because when you get down to the nuts and bolts of how it works, it’s really pretty damn strange. That’s why I use this online pen tool game/tutorial; it’s so fascinating. It teaches you by example, most of what you need to know to master drawing with the pen tool and it does so completely without language, which is something that can easily excite any graphic designer. Try it out for yourself and see how well you do. If you find it incredibly frustrating, maybe I’ll see you across the street at one of my workshops.

-Ryan
I’ll be speaking at the Small Business Breakthrough Brunch next Saturday, October 4th at Dig, a new incubator space on Buffalo’s Medical Campus. Come join me and Dan Gigante from You & Who as we talk about business startups, marketing and building a triple-bottom-line business. I’ll be leading the group through a special visioning exercise too. 
Tickets are still available. Hope to see you there!
-Patrick 

I’ll be speaking at the Small Business Breakthrough Brunch next Saturday, October 4th at Dig, a new incubator space on Buffalo’s Medical Campus. Come join me and Dan Gigante from You & Who as we talk about business startups, marketing and building a triple-bottom-line business. I’ll be leading the group through a special visioning exercise too. 

Tickets are still available. Hope to see you there!

-Patrick 

A few years ago a copy of the New York City Transit Authority graphics standards manual was found hidden in an locker and underneath a heap of old gym clothes. I know what you’re thinking: fantastic reading for in-between workouts, right? Well maybe not, but it’s definitely an awesome guide for the NYC subway system.
And good news! The guys who found it, Hamish Smyth and Jesse Reed of NYC design firm, Pentagram, have decided to reprint this wonderful artifact and distribute it again. They currently have a Kickstarter project set up where you can order your very own piece of design history.
Seeing this has made me think about the style guides and how important they are. It is imperative to display your identity in a clear and consistent manner. Because before Unimark designed the NYCTA graphics standards manual, the NYC subway system was a chaotic mess of different signage.
At Block Club we have our own branding book which covers acceptable typefaces to color swatches to logo requirements. Standardizing these elements makes everything clearer to your audience and presents the brand in a professional manner.
Take a look at a few pages of the NYCTA graphics standards manual above. Just maybe you’ll decide you want a copy of your own for when you workout too.
-Tyler
As an urban-dwelling yuppie that spends the majority of my life in front of screens, I’m certain that I’ll soon be the proud owner of a new iPhone 6. I’ve decided that my post-Keynote hand-wringing as I debate the merits of buying a new device is worthless: I always give in. It’s downright amazing how quickly I can convince myself that my phone is a total piece of shit the moment I learn that a new device is on the horizon. I wish I could be more principled in my buying habits, but I’ve simply surrendered. Every fall, I quiver with delight as I drive to the Galleria Mall to snatch up a beautiful, crisp, shiny, perfect, wonderful new iPhone. Apple might as well sign me up for a subscription.

Then there’s AT&T Next.

AT&T Next is a program that requires no money down for a new phone but instead bills monthly for it. For example, a 24 month contract on a new iPhone 6 16GB bills at $27.09/mo. Here’s why this sucks for you but rocks for AT&T:

1) Carriers have set a precedent of pricing iPhones at $199/mo with a new 2-year contract. They’ve traditionally recouped their costs through customers’ monthly plans but they’ve always known that there’s more money to be had. Steve Jobs was adamant that consumers pay the lowest possible price for the iPhone and demanded exclusive contracts with carriers to keep it that way but, well, he died.
2) Customers can still do it the old way by signing a new 2-year agreement, but prices are $250 higher per unit if you’re still under contract.
3) $27.09/mo x 24 months = $650.16 for a phone that’s outdated by the halfway point of the contract.
4) AT&T’s “yeah but” proposition encourages you to trade in your new phone after 12 months to wipe away the remaining payments on your plan.
4a) $27.09/mo x 12 months = $325.08. That’s $126.08 higher than customers have been trained to enthusiastically pay, and they still have to trade in their old phones.

From AT&T’s perspective, it’s brilliant. We use the same rationale across all sorts of purchases. A $9,000 apartment lease is only $750/mo. A $30,000 car is $500/mo for 60 months (plus interest, of course. This is America). Now a $650 iPhone is only $30/mo (or something, I don’t know, they just bill my credit card. I’ll pay that off with my tax return).

Here’s the best part: we all know the truth and we’re not fazed by it. At all. The new iPhone sold 10 million units in the first weekend alone. And every one of those units amounts to $126.08 more for your phone company than their predecessors did. Screw it, I’m in.

- Dave

Photo courtesy Bloomberg.
As an urban-dwelling yuppie that spends the majority of my life in front of screens, I’m certain that I’ll soon be the proud owner of a new iPhone 6. I’ve decided that my post-Keynote hand-wringing as I debate the merits of buying a new device is worthless: I always give in. It’s downright amazing how quickly I can convince myself that my phone is a total piece of shit the moment I learn that a new device is on the horizon. I wish I could be more principled in my buying habits, but I’ve simply surrendered. Every fall, I quiver with delight as I drive to the Galleria Mall to snatch up a beautiful, crisp, shiny, perfect, wonderful new iPhone. Apple might as well sign me up for a subscription.
Then there’s AT&T Next.
AT&T Next is a program that requires no money down for a new phone but instead bills monthly for it. For example, a 24 month contract on a new iPhone 6 16GB bills at $27.09/mo. Here’s why this sucks for you but rocks for AT&T:
1) Carriers have set a precedent of pricing iPhones at $199/mo with a new 2-year contract. They’ve traditionally recouped their costs through customers’ monthly plans but they’ve always known that there’s more money to be had. Steve Jobs was adamant that consumers pay the lowest possible price for the iPhone and demanded exclusive contracts with carriers to keep it that way but, well, he died.
2) Customers can still do it the old way by signing a new 2-year agreement, but prices are $250 higher per unit if you’re still under contract.
3) $27.09/mo x 24 months = $650.16 for a phone that’s outdated by the halfway point of the contract.
4) AT&T’s “yeah but” proposition encourages you to trade in your new phone after 12 months to wipe away the remaining payments on your plan.
4a) $27.09/mo x 12 months = $325.08. That’s $126.08 higher than customers have been trained to enthusiastically pay, and they still have to trade in their old phones.
From AT&T’s perspective, it’s brilliant. We use the same rationale across all sorts of purchases. A $9,000 apartment lease is only $750/mo. A $30,000 car is $500/mo for 60 months (plus interest, of course. This is America). Now a $650 iPhone is only $30/mo (or something, I don’t know, they just bill my credit card. I’ll pay that off with my tax return).
Here’s the best part: we all know the truth and we’re not fazed by it. At all. The new iPhone sold 10 million units in the first weekend alone. And every one of those units amounts to $126.08 more for your phone company than their predecessors did. Screw it, I’m in.
- Dave
Photo courtesy Bloomberg.
Over the years I’ve been able able to amass a pile of illustrations for Block Club magazine. It’s one of the things I most like about the field I work in—I get to take a piece of someone’s story and turn it into a thing. It may sometimes be heavy on the graphical side and sometimes it might be more abstract. On occasion it’s fairly straight forward. It’s always there to help push the story along. I find it interesting how we border the written words and the visual representation that accompany each story. ;)
-Tim

I am utterly in love with The Talks, a site full of interviews with some of Hollywood’s most elite mouths. People you actually want to sit down with, whose thoughts aren’t vapid, or strictly business, or just as boring as so many celebrity interviews you read. This is prime stuff. They’re conversations, honest and candid (if we are to believe; this is still Hollywood, after all), and full of life.

Its founders are two childhood friends whose work for pubs like GQ, Elle and Vogue landed them the kicks to go after heavy-hitters like Meryl, Jack (JACK!), Murray and Tyson, to name just a few. According to this Forbes interview, some of these are scraps from older interviews they’ve done, which as any editor or writer will tell you, are often the best nuggets of copy. Just because a published story doesn’t have room to fit the anecdote about your wild dalliance with so-and-so, or your true feelings about such-and-such, doesn’t mean it’s not good copy.

Find your way through this site and sit down for a read you’re not likely to find in too many places. This is good stuff.

-Ben

P.S. That the site is funded by Rolex is curious, as I had previously thought it was a Rolex promotional site, which while not a bad thing, deflating my journalistic idealism just a little. Apparently, it’s a Rolex-funded original idea from the site’s founders. Either way, smart plan for getting good journalism funded.

Images courtesy The Talk, and their respective sources.

I spent the last week of August in Paris, which was, exactly as I had dreamed: totally beautiful, inspiring and just magnifique. There are the just-dusty-enough cafés, the impeccably dressed people, the ridiculously cheap wine and the gorgeous displays of food. More than anything, I loved wandering around our neighborhood, through the winding streets of my favorite color palette (gray with hints of slightly warmer gray) passing all of the storefronts, some of them charming, some of them terrifyingly chic and some of them, well, doner kebab.
What delighted me most was how much hand lettered signage there was. I haven’t been to a city where it was quite this ubiquitous, and it really affected the feel of the city overall. Despite the differences from arrondissement to arrondissement, the lettering remained and it gave the city as a whole a sort of visual camaraderie, a certain aesthetic agreement. For better or worse (even for a lover of lettering, it’s true that some lettering is better than others), each storefront felt on an even playing field and in a time when we are bombarded with neon and metal and backlighting and “look over here! me! me! me!”, it was refreshing, understated and easy on the eyes.
I was so excited to hear that Christian Shaknaitis's Brush & Pounce moved to Buffalo recently and is doing hand painted signs in the traditional way. With so much on the horizon here, in a city that is filling up everyday, I can’t wait to see it start popping up more and more as I wander neighborhoods closer to home.
- Julie
Macintosh 128k Paula Scher's infamous Swatch ad from 1984 next to Herbert Matter's classic design.
I turned 30 this past weekend, so naturally I’ve been thinking a lot about the passage of time. Looking back at the world I was born into through the lens of 2014, it really looks like ancient history (which is not exactly making me feel better about getting older). This particular anniversary also has some intriguing crossovers with design and technology that I’ve been pondering recently.
On the day that Apple is announcing its sixth version of the iPhone, it’s interesting to note that Macintosh computers also recently turned 30. Steve Jobs and Co. unveiled the world’s first mass-market personal computer, the Macintosh 128k, in 1984 via a big budget hollywood style TV commercial directed by Ridley Scott, hot off the success of “Blade Runner.” The commercial looked like it could have been a deleted scene from that famous dystopian sci-fi flick as it depicted citizens of George Orwell’s “1984”, a gray-faced society of drones, marching single file towards similarly Orwellian looking monitors to receive a light brainwashing from “Big Brother.” The heroine of the advert, a sexy metaphor for Apple’s Macintosh, rushes in to smash Big Brother’s telescreen with a sledgehammer, proclaiming that the actual year 1984 won’t be like Orwell’s grim prediction after all, thanks to the liberating power of the Mac.

There is no doubt that 30 years later, the introduction of the PC can be seen as a huge turning point in countless arenas, especially the field of graphic design. That iconic TV commercial is also rather interesting food for thought this week though as millions of people around the world are lining up to buy the latest offering from Apple, all in the age of data mining, government espionage, PRISM, targeted advertising, Google, and Facebook.
On a lighter note, here’s some snapshots of what our world looked like 30 years ago. 
-Ryan
Color is such an important aspect of creative work that it certainly surprises many when they find out that an artist such as myself doesn’t see it as it is. Being colorblind has definitely made designing interesting. (And no, I don’t only see in black and white.) What I see is like taking an image in Photoshop and turning down the saturation 15 percent mixed with selecting all the red in that image and changing it to green. 
You might be thinking, “That’s strange, but can’t you just put colors together until you find something that looks good?” 
I wish. How can someone correctly identify what colors play with each other well and what colors don’t when they can’t see those colors perfectly in the first place? Finding inspiration to pull colors together in a coherent manner can be difficult for those with a slight color deficiency. Sure, it’s easy to “borrow” colors from successful designs and make them work, but that’s not what design is about in my opinion. I don’t want to make the old work. I want to bring fresh ideas to the table. 
For me, it is all about finding inspiration in the things you love and working with the colors inherent to those activities. Pulling colors from warm summer nights with my friends around a campfire or frigid windy mountain tops at a ski resort keep my colors working together and feeling fresh. 
And hey, CMYK values aren’t that hard to remember either, right? 
-Tyler 
Image by colorblind artist Yoav Brill

Color is such an important aspect of creative work that it certainly surprises many when they find out that an artist such as myself doesn’t see it as it is. Being colorblind has definitely made designing interesting. (And no, I don’t only see in black and white.) What I see is like taking an image in Photoshop and turning down the saturation 15 percent mixed with selecting all the red in that image and changing it to green. 

You might be thinking, “That’s strange, but can’t you just put colors together until you find something that looks good?” 
I wish. How can someone correctly identify what colors play with each other well and what colors don’t when they can’t see those colors perfectly in the first place? Finding inspiration to pull colors together in a coherent manner can be difficult for those with a slight color deficiency. Sure, it’s easy to “borrow” colors from successful designs and make them work, but that’s not what design is about in my opinion. I don’t want to make the old work. I want to bring fresh ideas to the table. 
For me, it is all about finding inspiration in the things you love and working with the colors inherent to those activities. Pulling colors from warm summer nights with my friends around a campfire or frigid windy mountain tops at a ski resort keep my colors working together and feeling fresh. 
And hey, CMYK values aren’t that hard to remember either, right? 
-Tyler 
Image by colorblind artist Yoav Brill
Picking color schemes for a project can sometimes prove to be a monumental situation, and super easy at other times. A particular color scheme acts a certain way and should evoke certain feelings from a consumer. When combining colors together to create a palette of colors creates an over arching tone for the brand and helps to guide the consumer in their choice.
Now try doing this stuff for your house?!?
I’m in the midst of getting my house painted and besides finding the right people to do it for a fair price, I’d say picking out a set of colors that you have to live with for a little while is certainly one of—if not the—hardest choice in picking color swatches I’ve ever come across.
I currently reside in a home that is literally one color. The darkest, ugliest shade of evergreen I’ve ever seen in my entire life. I cannot wait until the color is gone forever but what colors to change it to?
I’ve snapped some photos of color schemes from some homes in my neighborhood and a couple I’ve found through the internets that I find inspiring. I guess I need to figure out what my house’s brand story is and move in that direction. Only thing is I’ve got one concept to present and it better work.
Fingers crossed.
-Tim