Join us for the launch of our 35th issue, themed Better/Worse, tonight at our office!

The exhibition is curated by Elisabeth Samuels of Indigo Art and features works by Jozef Bajus, Lily Booth, Fotini Galanes, Kevin Kegler, Anne Muntges, Jason Seeley, Kathleen Sherin and Bill Stewart. 

We hope to see you! #bcm35


 (at Block Club)

Join us for the launch of our 35th issue, themed Better/Worse, tonight at our office!

The exhibition is curated by Elisabeth Samuels of Indigo Art and features works by Jozef Bajus, Lily Booth, Fotini Galanes, Kevin Kegler, Anne Muntges, Jason Seeley, Kathleen Sherin and Bill Stewart.

We hope to see you! #bcm35


(at Block Club)

Congratulations to our intern Aziza, who took first place this weekend at the Advertising Club of Buffalo’s Student Portfolio Review! Aziza is only a sophomore at Villa Maria College, but has design chops beyond her years. She’s been at Block Club for the last 10 weeks where she has been a great member of our team. Today is the last day of her internship, but she is full of talent and we can’t wait to see all the exciting projects she has ahead. Great job, Aziza!
- Julie

Congratulations to our intern Aziza, who took first place this weekend at the Advertising Club of Buffalo’s Student Portfolio Review! Aziza is only a sophomore at Villa Maria College, but has design chops beyond her years. She’s been at Block Club for the last 10 weeks where she has been a great member of our team. Today is the last day of her internship, but she is full of talent and we can’t wait to see all the exciting projects she has ahead. Great job, Aziza!

- Julie

A Simple Spring Cleaning

Head to the newsstand and pick up the April issue of Buffalo Spree Magazine to read Store Front, my monthly column about small business and entrepreneurship:

Although it doesn’t feel like it, spring is right around the corner. For me, green grass and budding trees always bring a sense of renewal. Spring is a time for fresh thoughts and new ideas. It’s also a great time to give your business a thorough spring cleaning.

Spring cleaning for businesses doesn’t need to be as dreaded as it may be at home. Look at it as an opportunity to shed some of the extra weight you packed on during the colder months by dropping processes and procedures that are no longer relevant, simplifying product offerings or actually cleaning house.

Althea Luehrsen, the Executive Director of Leadership Buffalo, gave me a great pointer a few years ago. I was drowning in a sea of never ending to-dos. Althea told me to take all of these tasks and organize them by importance. Every week, as tasks are completed, I crossed them off the list and re-order them. She told me to save the lists each week and after a quarter or six-month period, I reviewed the lists to see which tasks still hadn’t been completed. Which tasks were always at the bottom of the list?

I still use this method today. If a task is chronically at the bottom of the list, after a month, a quarter or even a year, you have to ask yourself why it’s not being completed. Am I lazy? Is this even important? Do I need help with this? If it’s critically important to your organization, assign it to someone else. If not, (and here’s where the spring cleaning part comes in) throw the task away. Cross it off. Get rid of it.

Simple enough.

Suddenly your business has a little more room to breathe and a small skip in its step. And more importantly, you feel a little less overwhelmed. You have to remember, you’re not just a taskmaster. Use this spring cleaning to bring new energy and ideas and to your organization.

Just don’t add this exercise to the bottom of your never-ending to-do list.

-Patrick Finan

I spent the weekend among my people—our people. The kind of people who make things with their hands, of their hearts and for their neighbors. The kind of things that make you go, hmm, this is new.
This year’s Buffalo Small Press Book Fair was once again an embarrassment of riches, from which we met fellow publishers, printers, writers, illustrators, designers, photographers, entrepreneurs, artists and active citizens. All of them were fans, and all were producers.
I picked up just a few objects for my growing but wrongfully small collection of zines and small-press publications. I especially liked Sean Nickerbocker’s collection of graphic novels, enticingly titled Rust Belt. I purchased all three volumes, which came with that awesome print (in the top right corner) that reminds me of Roald Dahl’s “The B.F.G. (Big Friendly Giant),” a favorite book of my childhood.
Major, huge, arms-open kudos to Chris Fritton and his team with the BSPBF, as well as their partners at WNYBAC, for assembling such a great group of vendors from our city and others. I think it’s a testament to having produced seven successful years (this year was the event’s eighth), and to our city as a whole, that we can attract so many eager, excited, curious travelers from cities around North America. We are so lucky to be able to share this great creative work with everyone who’s interested! We should always connect over art and design; we have no good reason not to.
Thanks for stopping down and seeing us, and thanks for supporting the printed word!
-Ben

I spent the weekend among my people—our people. The kind of people who make things with their hands, of their hearts and for their neighbors. The kind of things that make you go, hmm, this is new.

This year’s Buffalo Small Press Book Fair was once again an embarrassment of riches, from which we met fellow publishers, printers, writers, illustrators, designers, photographers, entrepreneurs, artists and active citizens. All of them were fans, and all were producers.

I picked up just a few objects for my growing but wrongfully small collection of zines and small-press publications. I especially liked Sean Nickerbocker’s collection of graphic novels, enticingly titled Rust Belt. I purchased all three volumes, which came with that awesome print (in the top right corner) that reminds me of Roald Dahl’s “The B.F.G. (Big Friendly Giant),” a favorite book of my childhood.

Major, huge, arms-open kudos to Chris Fritton and his team with the BSPBF, as well as their partners at WNYBAC, for assembling such a great group of vendors from our city and others. I think it’s a testament to having produced seven successful years (this year was the event’s eighth), and to our city as a whole, that we can attract so many eager, excited, curious travelers from cities around North America. We are so lucky to be able to share this great creative work with everyone who’s interested! We should always connect over art and design; we have no good reason not to.

Thanks for stopping down and seeing us, and thanks for supporting the printed word!

-Ben

Inside Sales Team is not your typical sales team and neither is their website. The founder of IST, Steve Hays has a big personality and wants it reflected in every aspect of his business. From the brand swag his employees sport to the way his office functions as a quasi command center running on sales wins. 

We are very glad he left it up to us to develop their website.

Here’s a peak at the website that just launched. Stay tuned for a full case study.

-Tim

Going through old files today, doing a little spring cleaning on my iMac, and I found this little gem from a few summers back. I must have been melting a chunk of ice from our freezer, drip by drip, when it occurred to me to record and reverse it. The result is a little moment of zen, in which warmth turns to cold, and drips turn to ice. Seems topical given our rollercoaster of a winter and spring. Enjoy. :-)

-Ben